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Olympic Peninsula, Wa

The 5: Easy Day Hikes in the Rain of Olympic National Park

The trail along the Elwha River, Olympic National Park

The trail along the Elwha River, Olympic National Park

 

 

We know it rains a ton in the Olympic National Park. I mean, you can’t be a rainforest if you don’t get a ton of rain! Heck, since 1961, the Hoh Rainforest has received measurable rain every single month.  In the winter, the rain in the Hoh is quite insane, with a record 42.98 inches falling in December of 1979. If you go hiking in late fall, early spring and the winter months, you will get wet, but don’t let that stop you from having a great time in the most beautiful corner of America. Pack your waterproof shoes, pants and jackets and hike in the rain of America’s best rainforest.

 

 

 

Hoh River Trails

 

Miles from Sea-Tac: A gorgeous 217 miles

More Info: http://exotichikes.com/the-hoh-truth/

 

Why wouldn’t you want to hike in the Hall of Mosses? With small loop trails or a long trail all the way to the Base of Mount Olympus, you can decide just how much awesomeness you want to take in. A good bonus is heading to the Hall of Mosses trail before then end of November, when the salmon are in the small creeks! Also, look out for elk!

Hiking along the Hoh River

Hiking along the Hoh River

A young bull elk with moss in his antlers

A young bull elk with moss in his antlers

 

 

 

Staircase Rapids Loop Trail

 

Miles from Sea-Tac: A short 104 miles of awesomeness

More Info: http://exotichikes.com/staircase-loop-trail-now-with-a-cable-bridge/

 

I mention this area on nearly every list for a reason. Good for hikers of all ages, this loop trail takes you along a gorgeous rocky river, through old growth forests and next a huge downed cedar tree. With a brand new bridge, this is a fantastic family outing for a picnic in the summer or an epic day of low-land snowshoeing, during the winter. Want to make it more difficult? Head up to Wagonwheel Lake, which is the 2nd steepest trail in the Olympic National Park.

 

The Greens of Olympic National Park

The Greens of Olympic National Park

Along the Staircase Rapids Loop Trail

Along the Staircase Rapids Loop Trail

Staircase Loop Bridge

Staircase Loop Bridge

 

 

 

 

LaPush’s 1st, 2nd and 3rd Beaches

 

Miles from Sea-Tac: The best 198 miles of your life

More Info: http://exotichikes.bigcartel.com/product/15-olympic-peninsula-family-friendly-trails

 

I have a theory about these beaches. They were given horrible names because no words can properly describe their beauty. What the destinations lack in name creativity, they make up for it in breathtaking views. The beach may at first glance seem like a horrible place on a rainy day, but if you check it out, you will have a great time shell collecting, bird watching and watching waves slam into sea-stacks, erupting in a white puff of mist. Be aware of tides, stay out of the water and enjoy seeing the power of the Pacific Ocean!

 

2nd Beach, LaPush

2nd Beach, LaPush

Walking to 3rd Beach in the Olympic National Park

Walking to 3rd Beach in the Olympic National Park

The Beach at LaPush

The Beach at LaPush

 

 

 

Lake Crescent Area

 

Miles from Sea-Tac: Just 150 of family bonding time

More Info: http://exotichikes.com/lake-crescent-and-marymere-falls-one-of-the-olympic-peninsulas-best-areas/

 

With your choice of Marymere Falls or the Spruce Railroad Trail, both of which are super flat, this area is sure to make any member of your family appreciate nature. The rain may be coming down, but hiking along Lake Crescent on the Spruce Railroad Trail is awesome. Hiking along the 2nd deepest lake in the State of Washington, see Devils Punchbowl, old train tunnels and the clouds resting above the mighty trees of the Olympic National Parks, is a favorite of locals and should be done by all. Plus, there are rumors that the lake might be haunted!

 

If hiking Lake Crescent doesn’t seem fun, head into mystical forest and see the always popular Marymere Falls. At 90 feet, wrapped in the greens of moss and ferns, Marymere Falls is an easy hike, complete with awesome bridges and walkways. This waterfall is gorgeous in the rain, as it is at a full flow than in the drier, more crowded summer months.

 

The 90ft fall of Marymere Falls

The 90ft fall of Marymere Falls

Lake Crescent from the Devils Punchbowl

Lake Crescent from the Devils Punchbowl

 

 

 

Goblins Gate and Humes Ranch: Elwha

 

Miles from Sea-Tac: A measly 145 miles of radical sights

More Info: http://exotichikes.com/dammed-no-more-the-elwha-river-is-free-for-you-to-enjoy-on-amazing-day-hikes/

 

The recently reclaimed Elwha River gorgeous year-round, but seeing it in the rain makes you truly appreciate the weather on the Olympic Peninsula. With rustic, abandoned homestead cabins and an otherworldly gorge named “Goblin’s Gate”, this hike is sure to be memorable. With forests that belong in Grimm’s Fairy Tales, hiking here lets you get taken back in time along the beautiful Elwha River. Bring a snack to eat in Humes’ old cabin, watch for deer and elk and enjoy being miles away and years removed from the suburbs or the city.

 

Goblin's Gate on the Elwha River

Goblin’s Gate on the Elwha River

Be dwarfed by the trees

Be dwarfed by the trees

The trail along the Elwha River, Olympic National Park

The trail along the Elwha River, Olympic National Park

 

 

 

The Olympic National Park needs to be seen in the winter months! With low rates on hotels, cheap flights and an awesome guide service for you to get to know the area, you would be crazy not to visit. If you are feeling more adventurous, grab our book on your phone, iPad or Kindle and head out on the trails.

Book a tour! http://exotichikes.com/tours/

 

Check out our Guidebook Books!

 

Hike Every Week: 52 Hikes on the Olympic Peninsula:

http://exotichikes.bigcartel.com/product/hike-every-week-olympic-peninsula-trail-guide

 

15 Family Friendly Hikes: Olympic Peninsula: 

http://exotichikes.bigcartel.com/product/15-olympic-peninsula-family-friendly-trails

 

 

 

The Olympic National Park is waiting for you… what are you waiting for?

Sunset from Ruby Beach in the Olympic National Park

Sunset from Ruby Beach in the Olympic National Park

Lena Lake Lounging, Olympic Peninsula

Lena Lake Lounging, Olympic Peninsula

One Response so far.

  1. Will Spence says:

    Douglas,

    I could not agree with you more about the beauty of walking the Olympic Peninsula during the cool and wet months. There is so much to take in and a wonderful opportunity for a peaceful trip to such a wonderful setting.

    Of the hikes you’ve listed here I been on two and could suggest more like either of the branches from the Lake Ozette trail head or any of the hikes available in the Quinault RF, even the hike to Shi-Shi Beach. Maybe these are a little longer, but they can definitely be had inside the day light hours if you use your time wisely.

    Using time wisely usually means getting started en-route to your trail head before dark and sometimes leaving your trail-head back home as darkness falls. But the eight hours of time spent out on the trial bring you many years of wonderful memories.

    To me the real bonus comes from the lack of traffic on the trail. They call this time of year the off-season for a reason and that is most folks desire the lightness of air and the sunlight afforded during the late spring, summer and early fall. There are many seeking to have the same escape at the same time. During the off-season you will find more solitude and a different kind of natural beauty. Oh yes, nice clear days do happen during the rainy months – they are the extra bonus days.

    I will make it on the trail one spring, but I will have to be living in the area for that to happen. Until then, give me the off-season. Peace, beauty and a bit of raw nature just fire the spirit. A spirit only found on the Olympic Peninsula.

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