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Olympic Peninsula, Wa

The 10 Best Summer Campgrounds in Olympic National Park

Numerous camping opportunities exist in Olympic National Park, but we take the guessing game out of where to stay and give you our list of top ten camping locations. From the coast to the mountains and the rainforests in-between, our best camping locations will give car campers from around the world the best of the best. With summer upon us, it is time to find our tents, load up the car with delicious camping foods and get out of town for a night, weekend or week.

 

 

10 Best Summer Campgrounds in Olympic NP

 

 

Kalaloch Campground

Kalaloch Campground, Olympic National Park

Kalaloch Campground, Olympic National Park

 

Why: Kalaloch Campground might just be the best beach campground on the West Coast. While not remote, the location of Kalaloch lets you explore the coast, enjoy Ruby Beach and get you close to the Queets, Quinault and Hoh Rainforests. If you have never camped, or never camped along the Washington Coast, think about staying at Kalaloch. It is the only campground in Olympic National Park that takes reservations and the only one with a store and a gas station right by the campground to pick up supplies. If you love beachcombing, awesome hiking and fantastic sunset, consider camping at Kalaloch.

Spots: 170

Amenities: Flush Toilets, year-round store, No showers

Cost: $14-$18

Nearby Day Hikes: http://exotichikes.com/the-5-best-hikes-near-kalaloch-in-olympic-national-park/

 

 

 

Mora Campground and Rialto Beach 

The View from Rialto Beach, Olympic National Park

The View from Rialto Beach, Olympic National Park

 

Why: The beaches of LaPush are some of the most breathtaking in the world, and Mora lets you camp three short miles from the breathtaking, breaking waves and timeless tidal action. With hikes to Hole in the Wall, Second Beach and Third Beach close by, life along the coast doesn’t get much more beautiful and remote. Complete with whales, seals, eagles, and salmon, and of course the Twilight series, staying near the Quileute Reservation will give you a great dose of culture, history and awe-inspiring views. If you love sunsets, walks on the beach and incredible sea-stacks, staying at Mora Campground and Rialto Beach is needed as soon as possible. With day trips to the Hoh rainforest just an hour away, seriously consider staying a night or seven here.

Spots: 95

Amenities: Pit Toilet, Running Water

Cost: $12 a night

Nearby Day Hikes: http://exotichikes.com/olympic-national-park-rainforest-and-beaches/

 

 

 

Sol Duc Campground

Sol Duc Falls, Olympic National Park

Sol Duc Falls, Olympic National Park

 

Why: Next to a gorgeous river, a must-experience waterfall and a series of hot springs that just happen to be the perfect temperature, staying at Sol Duc is something that each and every one of us needs to do. With hiking trails to mind-blowing destinations like the Seven Lakes Basin, spending a few nights in this campground will make you want to experience Olympic National Park every day. Sol Duc Campground is one of the more organized campgrounds and has 82 spots spread out over a few loops. If you can, head as far away from the cabins and Hot Springs as possible to enjoy deer walking through camp.

Spots: 82

Amenities: Flush toilets and potable water available May to October

Cost: $14 a night

Nearby Day Hikes: http://exotichikes.com/5-reasons-to-hike-olympic-national-parks-sol-duc-falls/

 

 

 

Deer Park Campground

Olympic National Park

Olympic National Park

 

Why: The prettiest (and only) high-alpine campground in Olympic National Park, Deer Park seemingly sits atop the world. Just 14 sites with no running water sit atop this exposed ridge, but the views make up for the lack of infrastructure. Staring from your tent to the interior of the Olympic Mountains or the beauty of the Salish Sea and Strait of Juan de Fuca, the campsites at Deer Park let you witness both sunrise and sunset from the comfort of your sleeping bag. Be prepared for wind, chilly night and a night full of stargazing unrivaled at any other campground in Olympic National Park.

Spots: 14

Amenities: Pit Toilets, No Water

Cost: $10 a night

Nearby Day Hikes: http://exotichikes.com/the-perfect-weekend-trip-northern-olympic-peninsula-edition/

 

 

 

Graves Creek Campground

Please

Pony Bridge, near the Graves Creek Campground in Olympic National Park

 

Why: The Quinault is where the staff of Exotic Hikes feels most at home, and the majority of visitors to this less visited rainforest region tend to fall in love with it as much as we have. The campsite doesn’t offer the greatest views, but the location is one of the best in the world. Close to remote hiking in dense rainforest, beautiful waterfalls and a high number of deer, elk and black bear, camping here lets you truly experience the wilderness of Olympic. For the best camping experience, stay along the lower loop next to the majestic Quinault River.

Spots: 30

Amenities: Pit Toilets, No Water

Cost: $12 a night

Nearby Day Hikes: http://exotichikes.com/olympic-national-park-lake-quinault/

 

 

 

Hoh Campground

Hoh River Trail, Olympic National Park

Hoh River Trail, Olympic National Park

 

Why: No rainforest in America is as famous as the Hoh, yet few actually take the time to camp and explore the region further than the Hall of Mosses Trail. Deep in the heavy mosses of Olympic National Park, the Hoh Campground gives you the chance to sleep in one of the wettest places in the contiguous United States. Yes, you might have it rain on your tent, but experiencing the rainforest is a rite of passage for all true Pacific Northwestern residents and visitors. Keep an eye out for elk and the rare, but always beautiful bobcat.

Spots: 88

Amenities: Flush Toilets, Running Water

Cost: $12 a night

Nearby Day Hikes: http://exotichikes.com/hoh-rainforest-hikes-olympic-national-park/

 

 

 

Altair Campground

Goblin's Gate and the Elwha River near Altair Campground, Olympic National Park

Goblin’s Gate and the Elwha River near Altair Campground, Olympic National Park

 

Why:  Many know the Elwha region for the dam removals that have occurred since 2012, but there is much more to do than see the banks of a river for the first time in a century. With great hikes, amazing views and some of the more interesting history of Olympic National Park, staying at Altair needs to be experienced by all. Altair is located near the beginning of the famous Press Expedition, as well as the near the location for a film made by Disney titled The Olympic Elk. It is also extremely close to the gorgeous Goblin’s Gate and the Dodger Creek Bridge. Camping here isn’t swanky, but with nice sites and a perfect location, you will be glad to stay here.

Spots: 30

Amenities: Flush Toilets, Running Water

Cost: $12 a night

Nearby Day Hikes: http://exotichikes.com/dodger-point-bridge-elwha-river/

 

 

 

Fairholme Campground

Devil's Punchbowl along Lake Crescent near Fairholme Campground, Olympic National Park

Devil’s Punchbowl along Lake Crescent near Fairholme Campground, Olympic National Park

 

Why: Fairholme in Olympic National Park is one of the more popular campgrounds, thanks to its close proximity to Lake Crescent and Marymere Falls. Lake Crescent is the second deepest lake in the state of Washington and the Myths and Legends of are reason enough to experience the region. However, the hiking here is awesome, from mountains to waterfalls and dog-friendly, bike-friendly trails, the Fairholme Campground gets you close to some of the more awesome activities of the region. Close to Sol Duc, Hurricane Ridge and within a short days drive to Cape Flattery, staying here is for those who want to see it all. Watch for deer, eagles and the rare bear while here.

Spots: 88

Amenities: Accessible Restroom, Running Water

Cost: $12 a night

Nearby Day Hikes: http://exotichikes.com/lake-crescent-and-marymere-falls-one-of-the-olympic-peninsulas-best-areas/

 

 

 

Ozette Campground

Along the beaches of the Olympic National Park

Along the beaches of the Olympic National Park

 

Why: Far removed from society, this coastal campground is perfect for those who want to experience the beach areas of Olympic National Park. Rugged, often wet and occasionally muddy, staying at Ozette is an incredibly experience. With the amazing “Ozette Triangle” hike just a stone’s throw away from your tent, access to some of the most remote coastline in America is granted here. While raccoons are known to steal food, they aren’t too bad if you clean up your site and use a bear canister for your food and toiletries.

Spots: 15

Amenities: Pit Toilet, No water

Cost: $12 a night

Nearby Hikes: http://www.barefootjake.com/2012/02/weekend-of-barefooting-ozette.html

 

 

 

Staircase Campground

Near Staircase Campground, Olympic National Park

Near Staircase Campground, Olympic National Park

 

Why: Staircase campground is the only car accessible campground on the eastern side of Olympic National Park and is also one of the more beautiful locations to pitch a tent. Next to the Skokomish River, the campground is near amazing trails and just up river from the always pretty Lake Cushman. Located a few miles from the Hood Canal, Staircase Campground is perfect for those in the South Puget Sound Region to get to quickly. If you are new to camping, Staircase offers family-friendly trails, cool places to explore and access to some of the more remote and under-rated hiking destinations in the state.

Spots: 56

Amenities: Flush toilets and water only in summer months

Cost: $12 a night

Nearby Hikes: http://exotichikes.com/5-hikes-for-the-weekend-staircase-olympic-national-park/

 

 

 

 

Can’t Camp? Check out our Best Summer Hiking Options

http://exotichikes.com/ten-summer-trails-everyone-needs-to-hike-around-olympic-national-park/

 

 

The Official Olympic National Park Camping PDF

http://www.nps.gov/olym/planyourvisit/upload/campgrounds.pdf

 

 

 

Want More of the Best Olympic National Park Area Hikes?

http://exotichikes.bigcartel.com/product/52-hikes-olympic-peninsula-trails-e-book-and-paperback

Want More Hikes? Click Image for more details

Want More Hikes? Click Image for more details

2 Responses so far.

  1. Connie Oliver says:

    Where can we camp with our RV?

    • ExoticHikes says:

      Most campgrounds allow RVS, but few have any sort of hook ups. The best option is to contact the National Park, or check out my new guidebook which will have answers to questions you don’t even know you have.

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